Is The Fireworks Code Outdated?

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Is the fireworks code outdated for todays better more spectacular and powerful fireworks?


  • Total voters
    6

AnthonyUKpyro

Royal Knight the 4th
Feb 13, 2013
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Since it came in of the period of the 70's it has never taken account of bigger more powerful fireworks that have come and gone over the years and since the introduction of BS7114 in 1988 has never been adapted for the two categories of outdoor fireworks in Cat 2 5m Garden Class and Cat 3 25m Display Class and now we have European Standards coming in and superseding BS7114 in 2017, things still have never really changed. It still assumes consumer fireworks are small and in selection boxes and still available small size in separates, when that isn't the truth at all. It has never taken account of safety distances and the extra hazards of bigger better fireworks available today either. It also still assumes that people use small fireworks in back gardens when this is far from the truth these days. I personally think it's about time it was rewritten and modified for today's bigger better more spectacular fireworks with emphasis on safety distances, hazards associated with the bigger stuff and improved safety precautions that take those extra dangers into account. ;)
 
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Somersetpyro

Moderator
S-T Fireworks Guardian
Dec 16, 2013
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I disagree actually, the firework code contains some very good advice, albeit some of it is common sense (though that does seem to be lacking in most people these days). And actually, it does take in to account safety distances, though in a very wide area where it says 'follow the instructions on each firework' So if you buy a 25m cake when you have a 10m garden, you are ignoring this part of the code. All the rest of the advice is still very much relevant.

And whilst i see your point that it doesn't take in to account big fireworks with the 'keep fireworks in a closed box' line, this is still a good idea, or if a box is not big enough, inside the house and out of harms way.

Also, don't forget the firework code is aimed more at normal people who may not have had fireworks before, or who only have small boxes from Tesco. Seasoned pyro users who do have big fireworks take more care, so will lay out their pyro beforehand in such a way that it is unlikely one piece will ignite another
 

AnthonyUKpyro

Royal Knight the 4th
Feb 13, 2013
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The "keep fireworks in a closed box" precaution is practically useless to those who quite regularly purchase, a lot of separate Cat 2 and Cat 3 garden and display fireworks;best thing for that is to get old secondhand lockable steel cupboards and some old secondhand lockable steel filing cabinets from the good ol' e of bay, put the fireworks in those, lock them up in the steel cupboards and steel filing cabinets in a garage or outbuilding or similar brick building safe and sound, it's safer drier and cooler with no risk of fire.

In a house you will have electrical appliances, maybe domestic calor gas mobile heaters, sometimes left over paints and wallpaper/turps and white spirit and other flammable materials from doing the decorating and doing the place up and perhaps other possible hazardous fire-causing apparatus;a cool dry secure place free of anything that might pose a hazard to stored large quantities of cat 2 garden and cat 3 display fireworks at home is better and secure storage methods such as lockable steel cupboards and lockable steel filing cabinets in that cool dry place will also keep them safe from hazards as well;)
 

Somersetpyro

Moderator
S-T Fireworks Guardian
Dec 16, 2013
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:confused: putting them in a steel cabinet is pretty much the same as keeping them in a closed box. Anyway, if you mail order fireworks, they do come in a box that is useful for storing them in.

And rather conveniently, you ignored my comment:
Also, don't forget the firework code is aimed more at normal people who may not have had fireworks before, or who only have small boxes from Tesco.
The people that the code are aimed at are likely not to have massive individual items, therefore keeping them in a closed box is a good piece of advice.

Also, don't go too far off topic, where fireworks are stored isn't part of the fireworks code :)
 

gaz

Administrator
Sovereign the 6th
Oct 6, 2012
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Solihull
The Firework Code does need revising, to account for the New reg coming into the UK. i do agree with you Somer The firework code is good practise, towards learning children for when they are old enough to buy for themselves. and for adults who wish to first time buy fireworks.

so to sum it all up, I don't think it is outdated fully. there are parts in the code that need changing, but us pyro nutters know it like the back of our hands and will always refer people who are new to fireworks to it, and to follow safe practice.
 

Somersetpyro

Moderator
S-T Fireworks Guardian
Dec 16, 2013
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Rather than revising, i think it would benefit to being added to, everything there atm is useful info, but i see what you mean, the more info the better i suppose...
 
Oct 13, 2012
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swansea
I cant remember the last time I looked at the firework code tbh. Having now looked it up ,I think the taper bit is the only thing I have a doubt about.
I never use the supplied lighters in boxes ,because I think they are pretty useless, unless they have got better in the last 15-20 years since I last used one.
 

Somersetpyro

Moderator
S-T Fireworks Guardian
Dec 16, 2013
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lol, i meant people who just buy from Asda :D
and the tapers, they're still very temperamental, they're ok for a very small display i suppose but portfires or a gas torch are far better